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Media: Literary Kicks Mentioned My Aristophanes Post

21 Mar

paularoid217via Lit Kicks

I’m not sure how I possibly missed this, but the blog I’ve been reading for the longest time ever mentioned my Aristophanes post back in December.

Literary Kicks is one of the very first websites I ever discovered on the Internet. Founded by Levi Asher in 1994, it used to cover mainly the Beat Generation but has since expanded to contemplate other forms of literature, philosophy, and art. I always feel like I’m exposed to new works of literature and ideas I wouldn’t have otherwise considered thanks to Literary Kicks. The comments section is full of regulars, some of whom have been around for well over a decade, who write thoughtfully and considerately.

What an honor to get a shout-out on the Literary Kicks Facebook page!

Clip: Scripps Magazine Features “Burning Furiously Beautiful”

27 Feb

2012-header-scripps-college

If you flip — or scroll! — to page 40 of Scripps Magazine you’ll see me featured in their regular column of alumnae authors, “ManuScripps.”

The column talks about how Scripps, the women’s college of the Claremont Colleges, fostered my education in the Beat Generation. …Which just goes to show you that feminists can like the Beats!

Special thanks to the Scripps Magazine and the Scripps College Alumnae Association for their support of my writing.

And if you missed it, here’s a post on the New York chapter of the Scripps book club reading Burning Furiously Beautiful: The True Story of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road.”

Clip: Marco Polo Publishes 2 Pieces of My Flash Fiction

13 Feb

Marco!

Polo!

Marco Polo was an explorer. Marco Polo is a lit mag, edited by Darin Beasley, that explores language and love and existence and beauty and Frank O’Hara. It’s a capricious call-and-response. A call to explore the little moments. Responses that show that those small moments can lead to big discoveries. It kind of makes you think about life.

And that’s why I’m so excited to have two short works of fiction* published in Marco Polo.

*They’re mashups of incidents from my life (sort of) and works of literature by William Faulkner and Evan S. Connell.

party“The Party”

yardfire“Yard Fire”

Clip: O. Henry’s “Gift of the Magi”

24 Dec

The_Gift_of_the_Magi

Do you have a favorite Christmas story? Burnside published one of the most beautiful stories of sacrifices — and irony — I’ve ever read. The O. Henry story, “The Gift of the Magi,” is published with a short introduction by me.

Clip: Iconic Photographs of JFK

22 Nov

JFKboatLTJG John F. Kennedy aboard the PT-109 in 1943 (public domain)

I’m doing a bonus post today! Today marks the day that President Kennedy was shot, and Burnside Writers Collective published my photo essay of iconic photographs of JFK. You can see it here.

Whenever I think of the Kennedys, I think of my grandmother. She was always reading biographies about JFK and Jackie O.

Clip: Vox Poetica Published My Poem “In a Diner in America Circa 1956″

20 Nov

Vox-Transparent

I’m thrilled to be published in vox poetica. The lit mag was founded in 2009 by Annmarie Lockhart, a resident of Bergen County, New Jersey — where I’m from!

The poem featured, “In a Diner in America Circa 1956,” came to me one day as I was walking on Park Avenue during my lunch break. I was thinking about Jack Kerouac stopping in a roadside cafe for a little nourishment as he traveled across the country, and the awkwardness and opportunities that abound when one travels on one’s own.

It’s a pastiche of Jack Kerouac’s interview on The Steve Allen Show, his narration of what may be the only true Beat film Pull My Daisy, and an amalgamation of information from his novels and letters as well as biographies.

You can read it here.

Happy 155th Birthday, Theodore Roosevelt!

27 Oct

HuntingTheGrisly

Ten years ago — wow, time flies! — I had the pleasure of penning an introduction to Rough Rider Theodore Roosevelt’s adventure memoir Hunting the Grisly and Other Sketches. As part of my research, I toured his birthplace, a gorgeous brownstone right here in New York City. I loved hearing the inspirational story of how he was a sickly child whose love for reading and nature led to him becoming an advocate for conservation. Just like Jack Kerouac later would, Roosevelt read Leo Tolstoy and dime-store westerns, traveled America, dreamed of ranching (Roosevelt actually did ranch; Kerouac was a lot of talk), became associated with hyper-masculinity, and created a legend out of himself through his writing.

Today marks the 155th anniversary of Theodore Roosevelt’s birth.

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Burning Furiously Beautiful: The True Story of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road” is now available as an ebook and paperback!

We’re in Empty Mirror!

14 Oct

Empty Mirror published an excerpt from Burning Furiously Beautiful!

The excerpt is from the sections “The Sea Is My Brother” and “Schizoid” from the beginning of the biography. It begins with Jack Kerouac’s Lowell friend, a Greek American named Sebastian Sampas, going off to Camp Lee and then tells of Kerouac’s time in boot camp. During this time period, the young author was working on the book The Sea Is My Brother.

 

Want to read another excerpt?

Here’s one on the tragic life story of Kerouac’s father.

* * *

Burning Furiously Beautiful: The True Story of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road” is now available as an ebook and paperback!

Clip: How Do You Like Them Apples?

8 Oct

apple3Carl Larsson’s Apple Harvest (1903)

My latest art post is up on Burnside. It’s all about how artists, from  Louise Moillon to Sarah Stupak, have depicted apples over the years. You can read it here.

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Burning Furiously Beautiful is now available as an ebook! You can download your copy here.

Clip: 8 Contemporary Syrian Artists to Know

20 Sep

With devastating allegations that the Syrian government was responsible for chemical attacks on more than three hundred of its own citizens this past August and nightly news reports detailing the atrocities of civil war, the world casts its collective eye on Syria. Political pundits and laymen alike argue whether the US should step in and take military action.

Syria is more than a land of strife. Its capital, Damascus, is reportedly the oldest continuously inhabited city in the entire world.

From the bible, we know Damascus as the place where Paul was converted to Christianity. By the nineteenth century, Syria significantly contributed to the literature of the Arab world. Today, Damascus has an influential music scene. Syria’s contemporary art speaks to this rich culture as well as its atrocities.

Art preserves history. It is a visual lens through which we can better understand the socio-political milieus that have gone before us and that we live through today. Artists are particularly tuned into the world around them. They interpret what they see through paintings, photography, sculpture, cartoons, and collage, and in turn we may come to understand issues pertaining to religion, the economy, gender, and power through their civilian eyes. Their images may reach us in ways that words—particularly that of news reports—cannot.

Read more of my art post “8 Contemporary Syrian Artists to Know” on Burnside Writers Collective.