Tag Archives: Spanish Harlem

Tonite: I’m Talking with Tim Z. Hernandez

19 Sep

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Just a quick reminder that I’ll be expanding upon my interview with award-winning poet Tim Z. Hernandez at La Casa Azul (143 E. 103rd, NYC) tonight at 6:00. We’ll be talking about his new book Manana Means Heaven, whether Jack Kerouac was a womanizer, what it’s like to write sex scenes about someone’s grandmother, the difference between fiction and creative nonfiction, and a whole lot more.

Tim will give a reading and will sign books — and DJ Aztec Parrot will be spinning music from the 1940s and ’50s.

I’m super excited! Hope to see you there!!

Mediabistro posted about the event here.

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In the meantime, check out the awesome photos of Bea Franco and Tim’s guest post over on Rick Dale’s blog The Daily Beat, read an excerpt of Manana Means Heaven on La Bloga, and stop by to see Tim on The Big Idea. Then, follow along on the rest of Tim’s blog hop:

Friday, September 20 | The Dan O’Brien Project http://thedanobrienproject.blogspot.com/

Saturday, September 21 | Impressions of a Reader http://www.impressionsofareader.com/

If you happen to be in the New York area, Tim Hernandez will also be on a panel at the Brooklyn Book Festival this Sunday:

The Poet & the Poem: Natalie Diaz (When My Brother Was an Aztec), Alex Dimitrov (Begging For It), Lynn Melnick (If I Should Say I Have Hope) and Tim Hernandez (Mañana Means Heaven) will examine politics and identity in poetry, and the complex ways in which a poet’s work can become intertwined with the poets’ personal narrative. Moderated by Hafizah Geter, Cave Canem Foundation.

 

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I’m Talking with Tim Z. Hernandez; Join Us!

16 Sep

 

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This Thursday I’m going to be in conversation with Tim Z. Hernandez, author of Manana Means Heaven, at the Spanish Harlem bookstore La Casa Azul. DJ Darren de Leon will be spinning music from the 1940s and ’50s. It’s going to be such a fun event. I’m really excited.

Tim’s novel Manana Means Heaven is about the real-life person who inspired Jack Kerouac to write one of the most poignant parts of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road: Bea Franco, “the Mexican Girl.” Tim tracked her down and interviewed her for the book, and she got to see it right before she passed away last month.

An award-winning poet, Tim pays close attention to words and imagery in his novel. We’ve been writing back and forth for a while now, and I have so many questions I want to ask him at the bookstore. There’s going to be a Q&A too so come with questions!

Here’s the essential info:

Thursday, September 19

6pm

La Casa Azul

143 E. 103rd Street, NYC

See you there!

*Please excuse the lack of the proper Spanish “n” with a tilde in “Manana”; I’m not tech-savvy enough to get my blog to use it.