Chloris and the Greek Myth of the Rose

21 May

 

The Greek myth of the rose is one of my favorites.

Chloris, the goddess of the flowers, was in the forest one day when she tripped over a beautiful nymph lying lifeless.  Chloris was so overcome by the nymph’s fate that she reached out to the other gods to transform her into a flower.

Aphrodite gave her beauty.

Dionysus, the god of wine, gave her nectar for a sweet-smelling fragrance.

The three Graces—the Charites known as Thalia, Euphrosyne, and Aglaea—gave her charm, joy, and brilliance or splendor.

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3 Responses to “Chloris and the Greek Myth of the Rose”

  1. Howard Posner June 26, 2015 at 10:05 pm #

    Hi,
    I also like the rose story, but I have searched everywhere and i cannot find where the chloris myth comes from. In the usual version, Pomona gives her fruit as well. I really want it to be a genuine ancient Greek legend, but I have my doubts. It all seems to date back to a tale in an 18th century book by a guy called Phillips, which then got repeated because it was such a great story. I can’t find anything earlier than that, and nothing in the ancient sources.
    Do you know of any ancient sources for the legend? It all seems very esoteric I know, but I am not doing it just to be a killjoy. if the myth does date back to ancient Greece it would help make sense of a nonsense line in Diocletian’s price edict of 301 AD, which in turn would mean that rosehips were a food cooked and eaten like a very small apple in Roman times.

    Thanks,

    Howard Posner

    • Stephanie Nikolopoulos August 12, 2015 at 10:52 pm #

      Thanks for your query, Howard. I’m not an expert on the history of the myth. I have seen Cloris mentioned several times in references to the rose, but I’m not sure where the story originates.

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  1. Clip: One Object Many Ways: The Rose | Stephanie Nikolopoulos - July 1, 2013

    […] Chloris and the Greek Myth of the Rose […]

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