Election 2012: Church of the Presidents

2 Nov

As we gear up to Election Day 2012, one of the main considerations voters have is: how do the candidates’ religious beliefs influence their leadership?  Do their economic plans care for the widows and orphans?  Will extending money to those in need unfairly take away the rights of others to the money they worked hard for?  Do their healthcare plans help all people?  What do family values really mean?  Do they look out for the poor in spirit, the disenfranchised?  Do they protect all people’s rights?  Do they try to play the role of God?  Does their faith make them weak?  Do their beliefs do more good or more harm to the country?  How should we vote when it seems that upholding one of our values leads to hindering one of our other values?

A few years ago, I visited what’s become known as The Church of the Presidents.  St. John’s Church Lafayette Square has had every president of the United States come through its doors since its first service in October 1816 was held.  You can read about it in my Church Hopping column on Burnside Writers Collective.

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2 Responses to “Election 2012: Church of the Presidents”

  1. Linda November 3, 2012 at 7:59 pm #

    Few or none of us will ever find a candidate that satisfies all our hopes and criteria for a president. The thing to remember is we DO STILL have the separation of church and State … I’d suggest voting for the candidate who respects that as a “must.” If gay marriage or abortion are hot issues for you … just be ready to get on a bus and protest loudly if and when things don’t go your way! … Cause truly … that is the American way.

    • Stephanie Nikolopoulos November 3, 2012 at 8:19 pm #

      It’s interesting that although we say we have separation of Church and State, our presidents have all attended this church at some point. Of course, it’s also “interesting” that those who talk about “family values” might turn away someone in their own family if that person’s lifestyle doesn’t match their perception of family values.

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