Tag Archives: typewriter

Hot Tip: 7 Kerouac-Related Places to Visit in Lowell Not Covered by Lowell Celebrates Kerouac

10 Oct

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Lowell Celebrates Kerouac (LCK) has done another fantastic job creating an itinerary that explores the town in which Kerouac was born and where he was laid to rest. If you’re spending time in Lowell and want to explore a few places off the beaten track, though, there are still many Kerouac-related places to check out. This is by no means an inclusive list, but it’s a few options if you’re staying in Lowell longer, creating your own tour, or looking to dig deeper into Lowell’s history.

1.  Kerouac’s typewriter is on display at the Mill Girls and Immigrants Exhibit at the Morgan Cultural Center … unfortunately, due to the government shut down you probably won’t be able to see it right now.

2.  It seems fitting that the National Streetcar Museum is in the hometown of the author of On the Road. Visiting the museum will give you context to the transportation history that played an important role in Kerouac’s life and literature.

3.  The  Pow-Wow Oak Tree is believed to have stood for 300 years! It was a sacred meeting place for Native Americans. Given Kerouac’s Native American ties, this may be a unique stop on your tour. Unfortunately, the tree was cut down just this year, but you can still visit the place where it stood.

4.  Kerouac’s birth home, which is on the LCK tour, has yet to be made into a museum, but painter James McNeill Whistler’s birthplace has been owned by the Lowell Art Association since 1908 and is now a museum. Kerouac would have walked past it and known about this famous artist. In 1993, John Suiter showed his photographs Rumors of Kerouac here.

5.  The Sun is important to Kerouac’s legacy. Kerouac worked for the newspaper, and journalist Charles Sampas reviewed Kerouac’s work in its pages. It used to be located in Kearney Square, but more recently moved to the American Textile History Museum.

6.  Visit Monument Square, and you’ll pass by the same statues Kerouac once did.

7.  Dana’s Fruit & Confectionery has been around since 1914. We all know Kerouac had a sweet tooth, so it wouldn’t be surprising if he stopped in here. …Just don’t try to take any pictures inside!

You may also like:

My photographs of places in Lowell from Kerouac’s time that are still around today

 

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Burning Furiously Beautiful: The True Story of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road” is now available as an ebook and paperback!

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Writing Wednesday: Choosing the Right Writing Tools

25 Sep

Alison Nastasi recently posted a great article on Flavorwire entitled “The Writing Tools of 20 Famous Authors.” Critics have long had a disproportionate fascination with Jack Kerouac’s implementation of the typewriter, and I commend Nastasi for noting Kerouac’s use of notebooks.

A Columbia friend of Kerouac’s used to always carry along a little notebook, and Kerouac picked up the practice from him. In fact, his notebooks became so important to him that one of his girlfriends accused him of caring more about taking notes on what was happening around him than actually living life. When I interviewed Kerouac’s Lowell friend Billy Koumantzelis, he mused that Kerouac was always jotting down notes in his hometown bars. As he told me this, the intonation suggested he thought Kerouac was a bit eccentric in his writing habit. In Burning Furiously Beautiful, Paul and I go into more detail about Kerouac’s use of notebooks because it’s an important aspect of his development as a writer.

Truman Capote famously quipped that Kerouac was merely typing, and indeed typewriters are important to understanding Kerouac’s editorial process. His father was a printer so Kerouac grew up accustomed to printing technologies and was a masterful typist. His L.C. Smith and Underwood typewriters allowed him to spill out a mad rush of words, capturing the speed of the highway. These words and ideas, however, were culled from his notebooks.

It’s important for writers to find the right tools for them. Some authors commit their best works directly into their laptops. They are used to composing emails, and typing on the computer is more natural than writing longhand. Other writers, however, find that starting their first draft in a Word document only results in stilted text, as they are too quick to rely on shorthand, thanks to all the time they spend on Twitter. For many writers, a combination of different media work best, as they find the ease of cutting and pasting helpful to their editing process once they’ve gotten a first draft done in a notebook.

For me, personally, it depends on what type of writing I’m doing. If I’m writing a blog post, I indefinitely type it directly into the computer. Blogging isn’t my best writing. I care more about the content than the style when I blog.

If I’m writing research-heavy nonfiction, even then I will often write the majority of it on the computer, as I find it helpful to be able to keep my notes together and play with the placement of quotes. If I hit a wall, I’ll print out the work and mark it up with pen.

For memoir writing, though, I enjoy writing with ink in a notebook or even just a loose-leaf piece of paper. It feels more intimate to me, like I’m writing in my diary or writing a letter to a friend. I do a lot of my editing even with paper and pen.

When I was a teenager, I sometimes wrote on an electric typewriter. I think there was a part of me that had romantic literary notions associated with typewriters. I loved the click-clack of the keys. As an adult, I still see the value of writing on a typewriter. It is too easy to hit the delete key and to play with the order of paragraphs on the computer when starting a draft. Good drafts are often the ones where we don’t censor ourselves, where we commit words to the paper for a good long while before we look at them again and decide what stays and what goes.

Every writer needs to find what works best for them. Sometimes it’s a matter of trial and error. Sometimes it helps to shake up the routine every once in a while.

What are your favorite writing tools?

 

You may also be interested in:

Overarching Writing Tips from Writers from Big Sur: Don’t Censor Your First Draft

I Just Give Myself Permission to Suck

If You Miss a Beat, Create Another

Today’s the Day

 

2011 Gabby Awards: Official Welcome Salon

9 Jun

After the reception to honor the Gabby‘s Lifetime Achievement Award Winner Stephen Antonakos, I dashed over to the Gabby Award’s Official Welcome Salon, which was taking place a little further uptown, that same night.  Here was the teaser for the event:

Official Welcome Salon hosted by the Greek America Foundation featuring a personal appearance by internationally acclaimed jewelry designer Konstantino, and a rare opportunity to see the designer’s entire collection and purchase men’s and ladies’ items at a discount. Reception is complimentary for all Gabby Awards ticket holders and includes top-shelf premium open bar and heavy appetizers.

It was held at the Press Lounge at Ink48 Hotel, a Klimpton Hotel, located at 653 Eleventh Avenue at 48th Street.  As a writer, I find the story behind the hotel particularly inspiring.  The Klimpton Hotel chain was founded by Bill Klimpton, who first worked as a typewriter salesman and who opened Ink48 Hotel in an old printing house:

A former printing house located where 11th Avenue meets 48th Street, Ink48’s occupants have a long history of making a lasting imprint. A one-of-a-kind urban retreat with an inviting roof-top lounge, open-air gardens, and panoramic views of Time Square and the Hudson River, Ink48 offers special amenities and services to illustrate the unique signature of each guest. You’ll be invited and encouraged to make your mark in life while Ink48 provides the indelible inspiration.

The open bar served a variety of Metaxa cocktails.  The distilled Greek spirit, founded by Spyros Metaxa in 1888, was a welcome ingredient in such drinks as the Greek Lemonade and the delicious Greek Mojito, which I tried.  You can find more recipes — like Fig Heaven, which wasn’t offered and I really want to try — on the Metaxa website.

Inside was crowded, as Greek America’s movers and shakers mingled.  I may or may not be in the background of an interview that was taking place….

Outside on the rooftop was an incredible panorama of the New York City skyline.  I mean incredible!  As in, hard to believe.  It reminded me of being at the Grand Canyon a few years ago and thinking it was all a beautiful mirage.  The Manhattan skyline, like the Grand Canyon, looked like a movie backdrop.

 

Photo by Annie

 

 

 

I stayed outside enjoying the scenery, rather than tempt myself with Konstantino‘s jewels.  Athens-born Konstantino is recognized throughout the world as a famous jewelry designer.  If anyone’s looking to impress me, you can get me the blue topaz ring from Konstantion’s Clio collection or one of the cross-shaped rings from his Classic collection.