Tag Archives: Gaugin

Clip: One Subject Many Ways: The Sunflower

6 Aug

Sun1

I’m currently enjoying art critic Martin Gayford‘s The Yellow House: Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Nine Turbulent Weeks in Arles. Published in 2009 by Hachette, the well-researched book tells the story of how the artists ended up living in a house together in the south of France and how their time together influenced their work. It’s a great read for anyone interested in artists’ collaborations.

Both Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin painted sunflowers, but today we remember van Gogh’s still lifes better. It got me thinking about how even though van Gogh’s name seems synonymous with sunflowers, so many other artists throughout history have also painted this captivating flower.

Read more and see painting selections at Burnside Writers Collective.

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Holiday Gift Guide for Art Lovers

3 Dec

 

Well, I suppose it’s that time again.  Time to start thinking about what to give everyone for Christmas.  That’s what every commercial and store window is not at all subtly hinting at anyway.

Burnside published my gift guide for art lovers.  The guide shows how you can support independent artists through your purchases.

Here are a few additional ideas:

  • a beautiful coffee-table art book
  • a subscription to an arts magazine, such as Juxtapoz, Art in America, The Thing, or ArtForum
  • a membership pass to their favorite local art museum
  • a biography of an interesting art figure or a nonfiction account of artists’ lives. For example, Martin Gayford’s The Yellow House tells the story of Gaugin’s and van Gogh’s time sharing a house in France and Sue Roe’s The Private Lives of the Impressionists explores the lives of artists who were ridiculed at the time but whose works now hang in museums around the world.
  • if the art lover is also an artist, consider notebooks, portfolios for their work, classes, studio space, and art supplies

If money were no object, what piece of art would you like to own?  I’d love to own work by Ray Caesar, Robert Frank, Franz Kline, and Adam Wallacavage.