Tag Archives: 1980s

Foreign Film Titles of On the Road

24 Sep

The other day I was editing a book that mentioned an 80s movie.  This particular book happened to have been translated into English, though, and the title of the movie was botched!  The tricky thing with translation work is that there are multiple words that mean similar things and sometimes the literal translation isn’t correct.

The film adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road debuted in Cannes back in May and, although it won’t make it to the US until December, it has gone on to show in some other countries around the world.  However, if you’re looking to find out if the film is showing in theatres in your country, you may find it listed with a translated title.

According to IMDB, these are the titles that On the Road is going by in other countries:

En el camino Spain (imdb display title)
Kelyje Lithuania (imdb display title)
Matkalla Finland (imdb display title)
Na Estrada Brazil (imdb display title)
Na ceste Czech Republic (imdb display title)
On the road – Unterwegs Germany (imdb display title)
Onderweg Netherlands
Pela Estrada Fora Portugal (imdb display title)
Sur la route France (imdb display title)
W drodze Poland (imdb display title)

Some of these, for example the French and Spanish, are literal translations, but it doesn’t appear that all of them are.  I believe “Matkalla” is the Finnish word for “trips.”  The Polish title could also translate as “In Transit.”

If you speak any of these languages, let us know if they’re exact translations.

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Parallel Generations

19 Jul

Why is Hollywood taking an interest in the Lost Generation and the Beat Generation?  Are there parallels between the generations of the past and today’s generations?  Is history cyclical?

From a historic standpoint, it makes sense that today’s generations are looking back at the Lost Generation and the Beat Generation.  Like the Lost Generation, the current generation has experienced war.  Although the Lost Generation predates the Great Depression by a few years, novels such as The Great Gatsby have much to say about the disparity of wealth, a topic that this generation has dealt with during the Great Recession.  Part of the seedy wealth distribution of the ‘20s had to do with bootlegging.  Prohibition may not be something today’s candidates have on the table, but there’s a definite right-wing conservatism bent influencing culture today.

The Beat Generation writers were those who were born around the time of the Great Depression and came of age during World War II.  Kerouac and John Clellon Holmes actually were thinking of the Lost Generation when they came up with the idea that they were the Beat Generation.  The obvious parallels between the two generations being the world wars.  While the Lost Generation was going into the Great Depression, the Beat Generation was coming out of it, and so while the Lost Generation was more about decadence the Beat Generation was more about simplicity.  Perhaps, then, today’s older generation is looking toward the Lost Generation and the younger generation looking towards the Beat Generation for confirmation on the way we live our lives.

After all, generations have followed suit in this pattern of economy and war since these generations.  The Baby Boomers were all about the money, and then Generation X was the slacker generation.

Since then we’ve seen Generation Y, also known as the Millennials or Generation Next, who are often thought of as privileged Trophy Kids.  These are the eighties babies (give or take) that are now in their twenties, a few even in their thirties.

Generations X and Y heard Reality Bites, My So-Called Life, and Fight Club tell us our great war was within ourselves.  –And then the terrorist attacks took place on 9/11.  It was around that time that Generation Y turned to indie music, the locavore movement, and reviving arts and crafts.

After that came Generation Z, or Generation I, the kids born in the ‘90s, for whom the Internet, the War on Terror, and the Great Recession are a way of life.  Generations Y and Z are the i-generation, each having their own personal computers, finding fame on blogs and in social media, the generation that is connected and disconnected.  They began looking back at Generation X, wearing flannel.  Miley Cyrus was photographed wearing a Nirvana t-shirt.

The Pew Research Center has a fascinating report that charts the different Generations’ attitudes toward politics, religion, immigration, marriage, and more.

Technology is developing at a faster and faster rate, and with it, generations are shortening and multiplying.  When you think about it, iphones models are even called by their generation, as in the second generation iphone, acknowledging how much generations are defined by technology, as well as money and politics.  Therefore, it’s easy to see how certain generations blend together, which may also be a result, as the Pew Research Center data seems to suggest, of the delayed adulthood.

What generation do you identify with?

Tasty Tuesday: Memories of Orzo

11 Oct

When I was a kid, I loved going to Baltimore to visit my cousins.  We’d pile into the Volvo station wagon and drive the three or four hours from New Jersey to Maryland.  Along the way, we’d stop at McDonald’s.  Nowadays, most McDonald’s have a playground but back then in the 1980s, we didn’t have one like that near where I grew up, so it was always super exciting that we got to make a stop at a McDonald’s that had a playground outside of it on our trip down to Baltimore.  We almost never ate McDonald’s when I was growing up.  My mom said it was “disgusting,” and my dad called it “plastic food.”  But we always got to have McDonald’s on our way to visit our cousins.

When we got to Baltimore, my aunt would always have dinner ready for us.  It was always the same thing that first night: orzo and meat.  My mom isn’t Greek and never cooked with orzo, so this meal always stuck out to me.  I wasn’t sure what orzo even was.  Was it rice or was it pasta?  It turns out it’s a rice-shaped pasta.  Now I know.

My aunt still makes orzo when I visit.  Sometimes it’s orzo in a tomato sauce, like the kind I remember her making when I was a kid; other times it’s spanikorizo, Greek spinach orzo.

I’ve never made orzo before.  Strange, isn’t it, how a food that has such a strong memory attached to it can be something you’ve never even attempted to make?  I think it would be an easy, filling dish to make in bulk so I don’t have to worry about cooking in the beginning of the week when I have both work and grad school.

I looked up a few recipes:

Epicurious’ Orzo with Feta, Tomatoes, and Dill

Holy Apostle Orthodox Church’s Spanikorizo

Writing Wednesday: Memoirist Patricia Volonakis Davis on Finding a Direct Line to Your Readers

20 Jul

In my last Writing Wednesday post, I wrote about how memoirist Patricia Volonakis Davis discussed the role of marriage and moving in one’s sense of cultural identity in her deliciously titled memoir Harlot’s Sauce.  In Jane Friedman’s Writer’s Weekly interview, “How to Find a Direct Line to Your Readers,” with Davis, the memoirst divulges some great tips on building a platform and reaching out to potential readers.

When thinking about her readership and trying to build an audience, Davis says:

I contacted Italian-American groups, and philhellenic groups (groups of people who love Greece).

I contacted websites, magazines, blogs that focused on female empowerment and personal growth.

In short, I made a list of the topics I visited in my story, and worked from that, writing articles to appeal to those readers in particular, and posting them on sites that had already cultivated a readership catering to those interests.

This is such great advice!  When I was discussing my memoir with someone recently, the woman with whom I was speaking wondered why I was writing about growing up Greek American.  She happens to know me very well and suggested that I have much more to share with the world than my ethnicity.  She’s right, of course, and I tried to explain that my memoir is actually about so much more than just growing up Greek American.  If I were to make a list similar to Davis’, the topics I touch on and the readers I would reach out to include:

Greek Americans

Swedish Americans

Expatriates: Americans (and other foreigners) living in Greece

First- and second-generation Americans: besides Greek and Swedish, also Korean and Japanese

Protestants

Greek Orthodox believers

People from northern New Jersey

Children of the 1980s

Graduates of women’s colleges

It’s my sincere hope that my memoir speaks to a wide variety of people, uniting readers of various upbringings.